Should I ask for a partial refund? Had to replace a pot

FleshOnGear

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I just bought a ‘72 1987, and immediately had to replace the normal channel volume pot. Should I try to get the seller to refund me some money? How much is replacing a bad original pot worth? Should I just let it be? Thanks for any advice.
 

Dogs of Doom

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IMO, if there's something wrong w/ a purchase, you contact the seller before you do any work on the item. Any service/replacement should have been discussed & agreed, w/ the seller, before doing the work.

If you already replaced the pot, what are you going to charge back? $5? :shrug:

At this point it seems moot, because you did what you wanted to do.
 

V-man

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I’d be cordial, because you already took initiave. At this point it’s the repair cost weighed against a feedback rating… if that’s even an option.
 

myersbw

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There's a lot of unsaid facts and circumstances that could play out and not be the seller's fault. Was this a local handoff or was it shipped to you? Was the pot physically broken as in a shipping issue? Did the seller mention cleaning the pots and all was working? But, as others have alluded to, quibbling over a $5 pot vs. a vintage $2K amp when it's a '72 vintage...? Nope, just replace it and move on.

And, here's one scenario that could play out. Let's say I go to sell an amp and test it. Hmmm, scratchy pots! So, I use some DeOxit and, cool, it's fine! That is...for now. The amp gets handed off. You go home...plug in and..."Well, crap, a really scratchy volume pot!!! Argh!" So, what happened?

Well, on a 50 year old amp, one cleaning may appear to have done the job...but...it can also just give the illusion it did. If it was sprayed heavily, then it worked long enough to test...it seems fine. Until the DeOxit fully dries. Then further volume control twists reveal that more crud was loosened up and we're back to more scratch.

Some old pots need a lot of cleaning. Some truly are wore enough to merit replacement. Without a little more detail, I can't discern what determined the part actually needed replacement.

As a tech, many clients I have in the Cincy/Dayton area will purchase a vintage amp and just bring it directly to me. I check preamp tubes, tension sockets, measure bias, clean pots, etc. I never expect a 50 year old amp to arrive pristine and not need at least a little attention.

And, yes, I've cleaned pots...sent the amp on it's way after 30 minutes of playing and checking controls...only to have it return for the scratchy pot, at which time I replace the ones that were marginal. (Yeah, some dismantle and see if they can save it. It's just not worth my time to do that....or their money.) That doesn't happen often, but it does happen.

In light of what you have...kick back and enjoy that piece of history! :)

BradM
 

Matthews Guitars

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It's a 50 year old amp. Running, but needing a minor repair. I'd just accept that this is likely to be par for the course for a 50 year old amp and move on. Unless the seller guaranteed it to be absolutely functionally perfect in absolutely every way.
 

FleshOnGear

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It's a 50 year old amp. Running, but needing a minor repair. I'd just accept that this is likely to be par for the course for a 50 year old amp and move on. Unless the seller guaranteed it to be absolutely functionally perfect in absolutely every way.
Well, it was implied to be functionally perfect. It was stated to have been serviced by a particular technician. And the pot wasn’t just scratchy, it was preventing most of the normal channel signal from passing to the mixer stage.

That said, it doesn’t make much sense for me to twist the guy’s arm when I already replaced the pot. I mean, how much of the amp’s value lies in the original pots, anyway?
 

mark123

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What are you going to ask for? $4?

It's part of buying online and part of the joy of buying vintage gear. IOW, let it go. As-is sales usually have no recourse unless it was specifically misrepresented. Besides a potentiometer is a wear item.

I just got an Arion Phaser off of reverb that was obviously in a flood. Got it for a decent price. It was listed as working and it works. Now it's my pleasure to restore it.

Here's the back plate.
8E51FDC9-EDA0-475F-BB5D-376685E3AF16.jpeg

A little belt sanding and it should be good.
 
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Wildeman

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What are you going to ask for? $4?

It's part of buying online and part of the joy of buying vintage gear. IOW, let it go. As-is sales usually have no recourse unless it was specifically misrepresented. Besides a potentiometer is a wear item.

I just got an Arion Phaser off of reverb that was obviously in a flood. Got it for a decent price. It was listed as working and it works. Now it's my pleasure to restore it.

Here's the back plate.
View attachment 114869

A little belt sanding and it should be good.
It'd probably be easier to just make a new plate, I don't think the pitting will ever grind out. There are car products like POR 15 that are specifically for rust too.
 

mark123

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It'd probably be easier to just make a new plate, I don't think the pitting will ever grind out. There are car products like POR 15 that are specifically for rust too.
The circuit grounds to the plate for shielding so I'll at least have to grind off the rust at the contact point. It's pretty thick. I think I'll grind it and see what happens.
 
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DaDoc

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Well, it was implied to be functionally perfect. It was stated to have been serviced by a particular technician. And the pot wasn’t just scratchy, it was preventing most of the normal channel signal from passing to the mixer stage.

That said, it doesn’t make much sense for me to twist the guy’s arm when I already replaced the pot. I mean, how much of the amp’s value lies in the original pots, anyway?

There's always a chance it could have been working fine when the seller shipped it, and like has already been mentioned, it's a 50 year old amp! I wouldn't sweat something as minor as a volume pot myself..Just keep the original so you can include it if you ever sell the amp.

I WOULD send the seller a polite message telling them about it, but I wouldn't give negative feedback unless the seller were to come back with a nasty reply..You could also mention it (again, politely) in your feedback message.
 

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