I need a talent pedal

Mitchell Pearrow

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It is what it is... part of my Job is also working with CnC Machines, and Computer work, so it's acceptable. I will never be a true virtuoso, that's for shure. An advantage is, of course that I know how to work with Woodworking Tools, and I'm trying to build my own Guitars. That's another compensation for me, when I don't have the power/ motivation to play: I do something else related to my guitars, like soldering, fixing or modding something, setup work, and so on.
I am also a carpenter.. and some days my hands feel like crap,, from all the different things we do,, I am going to be 64 in October.. I have taken time off of playing,, and come back to it a couple of times over the years. I know I am never going to make a living at it.. but I do enjoy playing, and reliving stress from the day.. to the OP @Roach practice as much as you can, before it’s to painful, to fret the notes, then practice some strumming techniques, then work on memorizing the penetonic scale patterns.
When I finally got the 5 pattern’s down, I started to double pick each note, and string skipping,, all this is going to take time,, I still can’t play for shit but I am enjoying myself..
Cheers to sticking with a routine.

Mitch
 

Eric'45

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I know I am never going to make a living at it.. but I do enjoy playing, and reliving stress from the day.
And that's what it's all about. Maybe one of the more helpful tips in this thread- don't try too hard to improve everyday, just have a bit of fun. You might learn things slower, but you enjoy the process!
 

Calebz

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My current project has me playing rhythm, lead and doing vocals.

I'm not particularly good at any one of those things individually. Trying to figure out how to do them in combination has been a bit hard on my ego😃.

If you happen to find a talent pedal with multitasking sidechain ability, I'll buy in with you.
 

Maxbrothman

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Title says it all. I was trying, not for the first time in my life, to learn guitar. I bought all this gear, then some left finger/hand pain comes up. Now, I haven't even played more than a few minutes in months, and I still do not feel I can play worth a dirty...
(obviously if I don't play, I won't improve, but am I just one of those that never get it?)

First, I don't hear well enough anymore to tune, let alone bend to pitch.
Second, I have only played unsupervised, and taught myself every bad habit in form, style and fretting that there is.
Third, I have no idea how to play ambient atmospheric sounds guitarists often make, or anything else resembling leads
Last, I turn 54 this summer, and my future is not hopeful.

So I need a talent pedal, badly.
You have described 99.99% of electric guitar players. Lessons help but here is the thing, you don't need to be Hendrix to enjoy the mental health benefits of guitar and gear. If you are coming away unhappy then try something that makes you happy.

Also in addition to this, plenty of talented guitar players are unhappy. Unhappy at the band they are in. Unhappy with the gigs and touring. Happiness isn't all tone or great guitar playing. Some of the happiest times I have had with my guitar and gear ended up sounding like a bag of hammers the next day.

However, getting my first proper profiler did help things out a great deal because I stopped worrying about gear and dialing in and instead enjoyed more playing what was there. You can't play ambient stuff? Hit the ambient profiles. Hit a U2's The Edge one or something like that.

Oh and never judge yourself by comparison to an album. Live is better and even then, lower expectations. Listen to people but don't let someone better than you try to pretend they got there by falling out of bed into greatness. Those beds are very expensive as well as the carpet, the combination of which give you great tone.

Always remember, the fatter your guitar straps the fatter your tone.
 
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GregM

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I always try mix up things with barre chords with ACDC . A g and d are great ways to play pain free !
And no matter how drunk you get , highway to hell always sounds good !
 

80sTone

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Let me know if you find one.. I would replace all the other pedals with it.....Maybe BOSS as a TP-1 (eeww wait maybe not a good marketing idea) or the WAZA version
 

PaulHikeS2

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Title says it all. I was trying, not for the first time in my life, to learn guitar. I bought all this gear, then some left finger/hand pain comes up. Now, I haven't even played more than a few minutes in months, and I still do not feel I can play worth a dirty...
(obviously if I don't play, I won't improve, but am I just one of those that never get it?)

First, I don't hear well enough anymore to tune, let alone bend to pitch.
Second, I have only played unsupervised, and taught myself every bad habit in form, style and fretting that there is.
Third, I have no idea how to play ambient atmospheric sounds guitarists often make, or anything else resembling leads
Last, I turn 54 this summer, and my future is not hopeful.

So I need a talent pedal, badly.
I just turned 55, picked up guitar maybe 4 years ago, fooled around with it on and off for 2 years and have been using Fender Play for the last 2 years. People who don't play guitar hear me play and think I can play. Not too bad for someone without a shred of musical talent who never picked up a guitar before age 50.

You have to really want to play. Don't look for reasons not to play - look for reasons to play. Two summers ago I injured my right bicep to the point where I couldn't wrap my arm around a Tele. I went and bought a Fender Lead III as I could play it with my right elbow against my side as it has a very small body. Took about 10 months to fully heal and I played that Lead III a bit every day. My guitar goal each day was to not get any worse, and playing a little each day - even if it was just 5 minutes, meant I kept getting a little better. Now I can play a several full songs on rhythm, plenty of riffs, and some rudimentary solos. My wife is amazed because she saw me start by busting a string trying to tune my first guitar.

Now I love to rebuild and mod guitars, am trying my hand at building a cab, and probably will learn a little amp maintenance at some point. I'm glad I never had a talent pedal as the journey is pretty damn rewarding.
 
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