I need a talent pedal

Roach

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Title says it all. I was trying, not for the first time in my life, to learn guitar. I bought all this gear, then some left finger/hand pain comes up. Now, I haven't even played more than a few minutes in months, and I still do not feel I can play worth a dirty...
(obviously if I don't play, I won't improve, but am I just one of those that never get it?)

First, I don't hear well enough anymore to tune, let alone bend to pitch.
Second, I have only played unsupervised, and taught myself every bad habit in form, style and fretting that there is.
Third, I have no idea how to play ambient atmospheric sounds guitarists often make, or anything else resembling leads
Last, I turn 54 this summer, and my future is not hopeful.

So I need a talent pedal, badly.
 

fitz288

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I suck at playing guitar - I'm a 55 year old accountant.
The gear I have far exceeds my ability to use it properly.
I have a DVD set from Steve Stine that I use when I have some time and want to learn a little.
Good info for general knowledge and technique, and I can do as much or as little as I want.
But I'm also happy just to crank up an amp and strum some 3 chord tunes for a few minutes.
The only way to eat the elephant is one bite at a time.
And a Boss SD-1 in the front end is my talent pedal.
 

Dblgun

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Some days I play well but my abilities are nowhere close to what they were when I was young and played several hours every day. Work, marriage, kids, grandkids and everything else take up the greatest portion of my time.

Thing is, the gear I have now is far better than the crap I had when I was playing all the time!. If I could only get a U-Haul and drive this stuff back to 1987!!
 
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ricksdisconnected

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I suck at playing guitar - I'm a 55 year old accountant.
The gear I have far exceeds my ability to use it properly.
I have a DVD set from Steve Stine that I use when I have some time and want to learn a little.
Good info for general knowledge and technique, and I can do as much or as little as I want.
But I'm also happy just to crank up an amp and strum some 3 chord tunes for a few minutes.
The only way to eat the elephant is one bite at a time.
And a Boss SD-1 in the front end is my talent pedal.
what Steve video? hands down the best teacher ive ever came across.
if you cant do his lessons your not even close to being smart as a 5th grader. lol
his stuff is explained so well that even they can understand it and do it.
 

fitz288

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what Steve video?
Music Theory for Life ( guitarzoom.com )
Some guy named Rick on some amp forum recommended it. :yesway:
Way better than half hour lessons from some shlep at the local music store.
And the 4 DVD set cost less than I used to pay every month for those "lessons".
 

ricksdisconnected

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Music Theory for Life ( guitarzoom.com )
Some guy named Rick on some amp forum recommended it. :yesway:
Way better than half hour lessons from some shlep at the local music store.
And the 4 DVD set cost less than I used to pay every month for those "lessons".
oh that sum bitch. yeah avoid anything he tells ya. that fugger has gotten my in trouble
way to many times over the yrs. talked me into buying way to much crap that i didnt
need too. classic dipshit that one. :coffee:
 

Ken Ops

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If it’s a possibility, get lessons from a real world teacher, in person.

If not, try digging around YouTube for the good stuff. It’s there, but you really do need to dig. Once you’ve found some useful videos, you can slow them down a bit at times, which can help. And just go over and over them if need be.

Or, like was said in a previous post, maybe some DVDs (or whatever format).

In both cases, something to play along with, which can work better than just hacking away solo, especially at first.


edit: But okay, I’ll play. ;) A “talent pedal”? Sure. Pick up a doubler, like the Keeley 30ms. That one can make your playing sound “bigger” in two ways: each note/chord is doubled, and some space is added after the fact. Quite a few pedals can do this of course, just that one came to mind.
 
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ricksdisconnected

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If it’s a possibility, get lessons from a real world teacher, in person.

If not, try digging around YouTube for the good stuff. It’s there, but you really do need to dig. Once you’ve found some useful videos, you can slow them down a bit at times, which can help. And just go over and over them if need be.

Or, like was said in a previous post, maybe some DVDs (or whatever format).

In both cases, something to play along with, which can work better than just hacking away solo, especially at first.
Steve Stine.
 

Matthews Guitars

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Take lessons. And try different teachers. Not at once, though. Pick a teacher, take lessons for six months, then switch to a different teacher. Repeat. Every teacher will have a different approach and you get to pick which ones work best for you.

My problem isn't that the talent knob is turned down, it's that the suck knob is turned up and stuck!

I'm way stronger on music theory than on practical application. That's unusual. But I'm used to being unusual. Turning theory into practice requires...practice. And that is my weakness. I don't have a good practice habit.
 

Tiboy

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I have an aversion to wasting money and to a lesser extent embarrassing myself. So sign up for in person weekly lessons and pay for 6 months in advance. Hopefully that provides the financial and self-esteem incentives to practice and learn. If after 6 months you find that your not enjoying the experience, find a different hobby.
 

BlueX

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Interesting topic! I re-started playing the guitar at age 53 or 54, after more than 25 years without playing any instrument. Now at the age of 60 I’m still developing, but slowly. I don’t have the same proficiency as when I was younger (intermediate), but I steadily improve. It can take me almost two years to get a riff down in my muscle memory, so I can start to express myself and not only think about how to play it (regardless of amount of practicing). I’ve realized I will never be a superfast shredder, but I’m able to play some favorite songs, riffs, and solos.

Q1 (and Q2): Do you want to play guitar, and do you want to develop? I hope you do, and encourage you to. It’s a great joy. Discipline and endurance can take you there.

Most important: Get a tuner and always tune your guitar (I'm no longer able to tune by ears only). Also make sure your guitar is properly set up (take it to a tech if you cannot DIY).

My favorite “talent pedal”: Metronome or drum machine (physical or app). Important to get consistency in your playing. Drum machine can also make it more fun.

I use the Fender Play app (subscription). Structured training plan, starting from the basics with technique, music theory, practicing, and different songs to play. Really valuable for me to revisit this.

I took lessons when I was younger. That’s a great help to get rid of wrong technique, and to learn more advanced rhythm patterns. Haven’t found a good teacher where I live now, unfortunately.

I do a lot of scale practicing, like major and minor scales (two or three octaves combined to walk up and down the neck), and “spider walk”. However, I like to practice in the form a real music. That also develops my “musical ear”. Mary Spender has an alternative to “spider walk” (starting at about 0:20 into the video), and one of Rick Beato’s videos includes some good stuff I use for practicing (also chords). Links below.

what Steve video? hands down the best teacher ive ever came across.
if you cant do his lessons your not even close to being smart as a 5th grader. lol
his stuff is explained so well that even they can understand it and do it.

Music Theory for Life ( guitarzoom.com )
Some guy named Rick on some amp forum recommended it. :yesway:
Way better than half hour lessons from some shlep at the local music store.
And the 4 DVD set cost less than I used to pay every month for those "lessons".
I like Steve Stine. Need to check out Music Theory For Life. Recommended by Rick and approved by Fitz, can’t be wrong.


 
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Bull Rock

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Bro, we all started somewhere. If it was super easy we would all be Eddie and bonamassas...I'm not sure how long you've been at it so far, but I can tell you we've all struggled with playing at times. There is ruts and stagnation. There is also times of growing. Find someone to jam with. That may help. I've been through the fretting hand pain before. It goes away eventually. I had to not play for a year one time due to it. Maybe try picking one song and focus on that. Play along with the recording until all the timing and notes/riffs are solid. You could also try tuning in drop D or open G for a while. Maybe drop the tuning down half step to make the strings a bit more plyable. Have a beer, relax. It's supposed to be fun. Good luck man.✌️
 

PelliX

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Title says it all. I was trying, not for the first time in my life, to learn guitar. I bought all this gear, then some left finger/hand pain comes up. Now, I haven't even played more than a few minutes in months, and I still do not feel I can play worth a dirty...
(obviously if I don't play, I won't improve, but am I just one of those that never get it?)

First, I don't hear well enough anymore to tune, let alone bend to pitch.
Second, I have only played unsupervised, and taught myself every bad habit in form, style and fretting that there is.
Third, I have no idea how to play ambient atmospheric sounds guitarists often make, or anything else resembling leads
Last, I turn 54 this summer, and my future is not hopeful.

So I need a talent pedal, badly.

There's the '1000 hours statute'. If you do something for or in excess of 1000 hours, you'll be capable of it. Play the piano for 1000 hours and you won't sound like Jerry Lee Lewis. Play the guitar for 1000 hours and you still won't sound like Hendrix. It's about setting obtainable goals and being satisfied because you're *enjoying* what you do. As for the hearing, that's a bummer - I think that is key, but if you're on electric, just turn it up. If you can't hear pitch, maybe you can feel it... :D Worked for Beethoven, or so they say. Pain? No idea what levels we're talking about, but I've literally played until there was blood on the fretboard when I was younger. The next day you pull out the superglue and with gritted teeth re-visit the battleground...

For some people 1000 is more like 500, others maybe slightly more, but in general any idiot can learn any practical skill at an elementary level in that time. I'm 35 and currently doing driving lessons - I was warned that this would not be all said and done within a year's time at my age. In itself that's not a reason to quit - and playing the guitar is "practically" free (strings, fret wear, sure).
 

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